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Feed Ingredients

  • Feeding Frequency

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · January 10, 2002

    Continuous ingestion of feedstuffs keeps the digestive tract running smoothly. Modern management practices dictate that many horses remain in confinement for long periods of time with limited or no access to pasture.

  • Forage Forms

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · January 10, 2002

    Forage remains the primary constituent of most well-balanced equine diets, but nowadays it can be proffered in a multitude of forms, from traditional long-stemmed hay to symmetrical cubes. The five most common forage forms are pasture, hay, cubes, pellets, and haylage.

  • Determining Work Intensity

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · January 10, 2002

    Optimal nutrition of the performance horse hinges foremost on the exercise it performs. Just as the diet of a human bodybuilder is dissimilar to that of a marathon runner, horses are fed with performance goals in mind.

  • Feeding the Mare and Foal after Weaning

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · January 10, 2002

    Weaning is a stressful time for foals and mares. While mares are often ready to say good-bye to their rambunctious, rowdy charges, foals can be far more fretful. As such, weaning rarely negatively impacts a mare. In fact, some mares may blossom and begin to flesh out once they are freed from the burden of milk production.

  • Feeding the Mare and Foal after Weaning

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · January 10, 2002

    Weaning is a stressful time for foals and mares. While mares are often ready to say good-bye to their rambunctious, rowdy charges, foals can be far more fretful. As such, weaning rarely negatively impacts a mare. In fact, some mares may blossom and begin to flesh out once they are freed from the burden of milk production.

  • Super Fibers

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · January 10, 2002

    Forage is chock full of fiber, a dietary component that is subjected to microbial fermentation in the cecum and colon of the horse. This fermentative process produces volatile fatty acids, important sources of energy for horses fed high-forage diets. Fiber can supply a horse with 30-70% of its digestible energy requirements.

  • Feeding Fallacies

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 8, 2001

    Feeding horses properly is not difficult. Reliance upon an educated horseman, a veterinarian, or an equine nutritionist is paramount if a feeding management question arises. This is particularly true when confronted with an old wives' tale.

  • Forage Falsehoods

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 5, 2001

    While some old-fashioned feeding practices remain pertinent in this day and age, others have fallen by the wayside. Over the last several decades, research has debunked some commonly held beliefs concerning the nutritional management of horses.

  • Don’t Pass on Processed Feeds

    By Associated Feed · January 17, 2001

    Understanding the methods used to process feeds and knowing why they are used will make the idea of feeding processed feedstuffs more savory.

  • Equine Nutritionist Q&A: Feed Tags

    By KER Staff · October 29, 2000

    <p> Can feed tags be used to compare different horse feeds?</p>

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