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  • Gastric Ulcers in Horses: A Widespread but Manageable Disease

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 17, 1999

    Every equine practitioner appreciates the delicate nature of the equine gut. Problems related to the small intestine and large intestine are well understood and routinely treated. What may be surprising to many is how often the stomach is affected. Specifically, the incidence of gastric ulcers is extremely high, particularly in performance horses.

  • Love and Devotion Help Special Filly Beat the Odds

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 17, 1999

    To anyone who has ever loved a horse, every healthy foal is a miracle. It is a joy and a wonder to watch them stand on their wobbly legs, take their first tentative steps, and find their first meal. While the vast majority of foals born every year find their way into the world in the usual fashion, occasionally a foal will arrive that provides a new definition for the word miracle.

  • Vitamin E and the Performance Horse

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 10, 1999

    Vitamin E is a non-toxic, fat soluble vitamin which has an important role in many physiological functions such as reproduction, immune response and nerve and muscle function. It also has overlapping yet independent roles with selenium, an essential trace mineral.

  • Making Sense of the Supplements

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 10, 1999

    Sorting through the numerous supplements displayed on the shelves of your local feed store or in the pages of your favorite horse magazine can be difficult. As an equine nutritionist, it is sometimes difficult for me to figure out the intended purpose of certain supplements. However, supplements can be divided into two broad categories.

  • Selenium for Horses: How Important Is It?

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 9, 1999

    Subclinical signs of selenium deficiency may be easily overlooked. Because the major role of selenium is in the oxidative defense system, deficiency would first compromise cellular integrity.

  • Selenium for Horses: How Important Is It?

    By Dr. Kathleen Crandell · November 9, 1999

    Subclinical signs of selenium deficiency may be easily overlooked. Because the major role of selenium is in the oxidative defense system, deficiency would first compromise cellular integrity.

  • Different Horse Feeds for Different Needs

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 8, 1999

    When a young horse begins training, horse owners and managers must realize the horse is still growing. The dual demands of training and growth make it especially important to pay attention to proper nutrition.

  • What Are Those Pellets in the Sweet Feed?

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 8, 1999

    This diet food scenario has proven very effective when feeding broodmares in late pregnancy. Most mares will sail through pregnancy in good body condition and can be fed the recommended amounts of sweet feed to provide essential protein, vitamins and minerals.

  • The Hoof and Its Relation to Balance and Soundness

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 1, 1999

    Flat-footed horses are very sensitive to the type of footing on which they live and exercise. They are intolerant of exercise on rough ground and may require pads to help them to be comfortable. Careful attention to providing corrective trimming and shoeing can greatly help horses that have hoof abnormalities.

  • Equine Nutritionist Q&A: Spring Training

    By KER Staff · October 27, 1999

    <p> Are there any nutritional considerations that will make&nbsp;spring conditioning more efficient and/or get better results?</p>

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