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  • Bridge the Gap Between OCD and Nutrition

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 4, 2003

    During normal bone growth, cartilage is remodeled into bone. It is during this physiologic revision that ossification goes awry and OCD lesions originate.

  • Optimal Body Condition Scores for Breeding Mares

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 4, 2003

    Evaluating the body condition of pregnant mares may become more difficult during late gestation, as the combined weight of the fetus and amniotic fluid may pull the skin tightly over the vertebral column and ribcage. Therefore, it's best to place emphasis on other key areas: along the withers, behind the shoulder, and around the tailhead.

  • Laminitis Basics

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 2, 2003

    While obesity-associated laminitis is not well understood among researchers and veterinarians, affected horses may go on to lead otherwise healthy lives if treatment is swift and diligent. Recommended treatments center around corrective trimming and shoeing, use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications for pain, and strict diet. Forced exercise can be imposed once all laminitis-related pain has abated.

  • Colic Risk Factors

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 2, 2003

    Equine colic is loosely defined as abdominal pain. The causes are numerous, and the signs of discomfort (rolling, kicking at the abdomen, pawing, sweating) are familiar to most experienced horse handlers. Colic is one of the most common health emergencies, with an incidence of just over 9 cases per 100 horses in an average year. It is a leading reason for surgery and a frequent cause of death in horses.

  • Collar May Aid DDSP

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 1, 2003

    A device known as the Cornell collar has been developed to reposition and hold the larynx and hyoid bone in place, thus preventing throat tissues from collapsing and blocking the passage of air.

  • Bute Research

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 1, 2003

    Research at The Ohio State University has uncovered evidence that the use of phenylbutazone, or bute, may hinder healing of damaged cartilage.

  • Equine Shock Wave Therapy

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 1, 2003

    Shock wave therapy has been used in both humans and horses to pulverize kidney stones, often eliminating the need for surgery.

  • Out of Work: How to Let Your Horse Down in the Off-Season

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 1, 2003

    Now you're planning to give your horse a well-earned rest. You know he'll enjoy a few months out of his stall, rolling in the grass and taking afternoon naps with his pasture buddies. You realize that you'll be modifying just about everything in your horse's day-to-day routine. How can you keep your horse healthy as he makes this change?

  • Equine Hair Analysis

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 1, 2003

    First and foremost, hair helps in the formidable task of bodywide temperature regulation, and one integral aspect of this role is providing a shield against environmental conditions, hence the dense, wooly coats of winter and the slick, short coats of summer. Other functions of hair include protection against predatory insects and a pathway for transport of pheromones and other physiological signals from the body.

  • American Horse Council Assesses Horse Industry

    By Kentucky Equine Research Staff · November 1, 2003

    According to figures released by the American Horse Council, there are about 6.9 million horses in the United States.

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